Teas-day Book Review

Teas-day Book Review

The Guests on South Battery -- Karen White

Book Five of the Tradd Street Series

Charleston, South Carolina

Present Time

Rating -- 4.5 cups of either an Oolong or Pu'erh (for the Spirits) 

Is there a more perfect match than books and teas? Both have the capability to generate an atmosphere of peace, relaxation, and journey. In my Tea/Book world reading a Karen White book is always accompanied by a generous cup of whatever tea appeals to me at that time. This book was no different, I found myself indulging in a lightly oxidized oolong that provided me the sweetness and peachiness (if there is such a word) of the South. Although the earthiness of a Pu'erh would certainly have been reminiscent of leftover spirits.

Relaxation -- the enjoyment of a good book and Grandpa style Pu'erh

Relaxation -- the enjoyment of a good book and Grandpa style Pu'erh


Okay now on to "The Guests on South Battery." Book five continues the story of Melanie (Mellie) and Jack Trenholm, their love for each other, their newly born twins, and the many spiritual citizens of Charleston that bring many adventures their way. The book opens with Melanie returning to work as a realtor after her extended maternity leave. Her first client is a young woman (Jayne) who has inherited a historic Charleston mansion from what she believes to be a total stranger. Jayne expresses her dislike of "old houses"  by intending to sell the house, it's belongings and its aspirations.

In preparation to sell the Pinckney Mansion Melanie visits the property with Jayne only to discover there is a strong presence of a good/evil spiritual pull in the house.  Thus begins their undertaking of discovering -- why did Jayne inherit the Pinckney Mansion -- is there a connection between the characters and the Pinckney Mansion --  why haven't these aspirations moved on -- and how will all these issues affect Melanie and Jack's life together? As the book comes to a conclusion many earthly and spiritual questions remain unanswered opening the door for the next addition to the Tradd Street series.

I have always found Karen White's works to be well-written, organized, and attention holding but why must the female heroine (Melanie) be so insecure about her appearance, attractiveness, and ability to be worthy of receiving love? Could we please have a book where Melanie is in control of her confidence, successful in her own right, and not dependent upon the emotions of her male counterpart for happiness. Having said that, I will still continue to buy and read Karen White's books. I love Charleston, its history, its spirits, and its tea!

Lifting my cuppa today to "Spiritual" mysteries, 

The Tea And Hat Lady